About

“Like a low rent Rod Liddle” – Satisfied Reader

“A patently dishonest man” – Owen Jones

“Political expert” – Andrew Neil

 

Semi-Partisan Politics is a political blog by me, Samuel Hooper – an erstwhile management consultant turned political journalist and blogger, currently living in London with my Texan wife.

This blog Samuel Hooper - Daily Politics - BBC - Caricature - Sketch - Cartoon - 2offers a running commentary on British and American politics, culture and current affairs. I retrained in journalism with London-based social enterprise Poached Creative and can usually be found somewhere online, droning on about politics, free markets, civil liberties, conservatarianism or classical music.

I also regularly write for Conservatives for Liberty, The Daily Globe and Guerrilla Policy, debate on London Live TV and have appeared as a guest on the BBC Daily Politics.

TRIGGER WARNING (TW): Unapologetically conservatarian views and ideas expressed here. This is not a Safe Space.

 

Samuel Hooper - Daily Politics - BBC - Semi Partisan Politics - 2

Semi-Partisan Politics is building an audience and a reputation by campaigning – very loudly and unapologetically – for the following goals and ideals:

Brexit: freedom from the European Union

Democratic renewal and national sovereignty

Constitutional reform and a federal UK

Separation of church and state

Opposing the Cult of Social Justice And Identity Politics

Healthcare reform, not NHS worship

Smaller, smarter government

Free speech, without restriction

Fighting timid centrism on the Right

Fighting empty virtue-signalling on the Left

If you agree with these objectives and enjoy this blog’s coverage and commentary, please do consider using the PayPal tip jar to make a small contribution to my work:

samuel-hooper-london-live-headline-london-eid-diwali-public-holiday-2

More about the author:

I primarily write about politics, especially stories which touch on economic and personal freedom, civil liberties and the role and behaviour of government.

In Britain, this makes me a libertarian-leaning voter who doesn’t subscribe to the socially conservative and authoritarian parts of the Conservative or UKIP platforms, though I supported the Conservatives in the 2010 general election, (after much soul-searching) UKIP in 2015 and (despairingly) Conservative again in 2017.

In the United States, this makes me politically homeless, though when confronted with Sarah Palin’s Republican Party I supported Barack Obama in 2008 and again, reluctantly, in 2012. The unhinged candidacy of Donald Trump forced me to favour Hillary Clinton in 2016, though this blog has consistently argued that the complaints of many Trump supporters are valid and need to be taken far more seriously.

I have travelled extensively in the United States, spending much of my time in the Mid-West, including a year living in Chicago, as well as time with my wife’s family in south Texas.

I never tire of discovering new differences and similarities between Brits and Americans, who have so much in common but also so much to distinguish themselves from one another.

And I will never tire of Chicago deep dish pizza, properly made cheeseburgers or authentic Tex-Mex food from the Rio Grande Valley.

Please feel free to contact me here, and do take a moment to sign up for Facebook and Twitter updates to receive all the latest news and blog posts.

Follow Semi-Partisan Politics on Twitter @SamHooper

Follow Semi-Partisan Politics on Facebook here.

 

Samuel J Hooper

Top Cartoon Image: Drawn by World of Roper, used here by kind permission

Advertisements

34 thoughts on “About

  1. Chauncey Tinker August 18, 2016 / 10:58 AM

    I have been reading your blog for some time now, so I thought it was time to make some general observations.

    On the positive side I agree strongly with you on these things:

    1. The voting age needs to be raised to (at least) 21.

    2. Current politicians have lost sight of some of the most fundamental principles which used to make our country such a force for good in the world, particularly – freedom of speech and equality before the law. Increasing numbers of laws have been created that endanger these principles in a fundamental way, and increasingly the law is being applied unequally in ways that are damaging for society.

    3. The decline of rational thought and inquiry in our universities is a grave cause for concern. I am inclined to believe that universities overall (in non-technical areas) have actually become a negative force against our society and are encouraging the disastrous trends in point 2.

    4. The church and the state should be separated – lords spiritual out!

    5. The state needs to shrink.

    6. The UK must leave the EU.

    On the negative side I disagree strongly with you on one thing in particular:

    There is a persistent idea going on here (which is commonplace throughout the mainstream media in fact) that some sort of reformation of Islam to a more “moderate form” is possible and desirable. I disagree with this view very strongly on both counts. This is a huge subject not suitable for discussion on this page of course but I hope you will take the time to listen to my arguments carefully on this as I feel it is a matter of the very greatest concern.

    There is a much better way forward for the world, and that is for people to simply abandon this religion altogether. That might not be such a difficult thing to accomplish as some people seem to imagine, and yes there are alternatives for those who feel the need for spiritual guidance. It seems throughout the world the courage to even question the religion is receding, in fact I believe many governments including our own are increasingly trying to suppress such attempts. I think the failure of the BBC to air the views of those critical of the religion is one of several huge stains on the reputation of the organization and I have long been firmly of the opinion that it should be completely privatized.

    I am earnestly trying to address these huge questions of our time at my own blog. I feel that many of these problems we are looking at are in fact symptoms of greater underlying problems that we are ignoring at our peril.

    Much though I may disagree with you on some of these things I am very glad your blog exists as you are a rare voice of reason on the positive points. I therefore hope you continue to blog for as long as possible.

    Like

    • Samuel Hooper August 19, 2016 / 12:51 AM

      Many thanks for your readership and your frequent informed comments on my blog – they are always thought provoking and much appreciated. I checked out your own blog with interest some time ago when we were in the midst of a previous discussion, but I will certainly take another look. I’m the first to admit that my knowledge of Islam is slender, and I certainly cannot write about it with anywhere near the same authority as I might my own faith (Roman Catholicism). I admit that my references to a more moderate, liberal form of Islam have been informed far less by any deep theological knowledge but more from anecdotal evidence based on conversations I have had with (predominantly) non-practising Muslims. When time permits I hope to deepen my understanding, and will certainly use your blog as a resource.

      Thanks again for your kind words and continued readership! All the best.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Paul July 26, 2016 / 5:51 PM

    I have just spent about an hour of my valuable life reading your blogs, especially about the EU Referendum results. Unfortunately, you do not offer anything interesting because you don’t have any idea what the real problem is at present. Nobody, even you, understands that everything like the EU, ISIS, Terrorism, NHS, Trump, Brexit, Remain, May, Merkel, Refugees, Rich, Poor, Inequality, Communism, Capitalism, Greed, Altruism, Etc. is not the real problem. The real problem is that we humans procreate like the rabbits in Australia, and eventually there will be no solution to the ongoing overpopulation. The world’s population has quadrupled in the past 50 years from like 2 Billion to almost 8 Billion and nobody, I mean nobody, including you, understands that such is the real problem of this stupid species called the Humankind. So your dearly blog has nothing to offer. There are so many like you on the Internet, and you all just get utterly boring. If you are so smart, why don’t you offer an ultimate solution to the real problem at hand? I myself contributed to the solution by having no children, on purpose, even by sending some of my former impregnated girlfriends for abortions paid by myself. I am 50 years old, I was born behind the Iron Curtain and lived there until I was 20, then I defected and I lived in Austria, Germany, Mexico, Belize, Czech Republic, USA and visited other dozen countries around the world. I am currently an EU Citizen living in the UK while exercising my Treaty Rights. I have been here for over 6 years and I am going to die here. And I am poor, and I was not allowed to vote in the EU Referendum idiocracy. So don’t get offended that I just do not buy your boring blog.
    Sincerely
    Paul

    Like

    • Samuel Hooper July 26, 2016 / 8:20 PM

      Dear Paul,

      Thank you for bestowing a precious hour of your life reading my (unworthy) blog and taking the time to inform me of the many ways in which you found it wanting. I am sorry that my failure to propose the immediate extermination of 6 billion people on the pages of this blog has caused you frustration.

      The world will no doubt achingly regret your brave decision not to procreate, but if overpopulation is about to kill us all then at least our suffering will be relatively brief.

      Best wishes,

      Sam

      Like

      • Paul July 26, 2016 / 9:30 PM

        I did not expect your reply. The problem with you is that you are missing the fundamental point. The idea of exterminating 6 billion people was yours, not mine, so don’t put it on me, okay! Why don’t you continue blogging your irrelevant nonsense here, and please, do not reply! I don’t want to use profanity here because you might find it “inappropriate”. As long as you, in the past 6 years, watched the Eastern European Gypsy families coming to England while all of them having around 8 to 13 children each, while none of them ever acquiring work, all claiming Child Benefits and Child Tax Credits and Disability Living Allowances and Housing Benefits and Council Tax Reductions, while claiming simultaneously the identical benefits in their home countries, then you would not be in disagreement with me. You, the UK, could have prevented such influx but you didn’t, and now you, Mr. Hooper, are blaming the poor for voting for Brexit as a protest? You are just one of those elite snub noses who believe that they chose to whom they were born and in what country. Why don’t you just get a life, stop being hypocratic about telling everybody how happy you are, because only miserable narrow-minded psychos like you would spend time blogging nonsense instead enjoying their lives. Go …. yourself!

        Like

        • Samuel Hooper July 28, 2016 / 2:30 AM

          Please do not reply? You’re hilarious. You seem to be forgetting that this is my blog, sir. When you choose to ramble incoherently about overpopulation on my About page, you can expect a response and a little bit of mockery too, I’m afraid. If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. And don’t run with knives. People like you should definitely not run with knives, or any other sharp object.

          I also now distrust your assertion that you spent an hour of your precious time reading my articles. If you had actually done so you would surely have worked out that I strongly supported Brexit, and have consistently been in full solidarity with “the poor” and anyone else who values our democracy enough to vote to leave the European Union.

          So why don’t you take your ranting about overpopulation, hatred of Gypsy communities and ignorance about the blog you are attacking and stick them where the sun don’t shine, my good fellow? There’s a lad.

          Let me close by quoting the words of a complete idiot:

          “And please, do not reply!”

          Like

    • Jack Wadsley August 17, 2016 / 8:50 PM

      Naturally you ended up here. Like every other bleeder.

      Like

  3. Derek Reynolds July 12, 2016 / 8:24 PM

    Many thanks for your ongoing blog. As a retired working class man I have had more time of late to absorb politics, with an especial focus on leaving the EU. Previously I have been of the opinion that if voting changed anything they’d ban it. But a referendum that gave the population and option of out – that I had to vote for – OUT. The reasons are primarily to escape the oligarchy of unelected bureaucrats, and against a government who, despite claiming to be a listening government (or was that Labour – all the same now), never seem to listen. And to gain our place in the World once again and not be a ‘region’ of the unaccountable and unelected.

    We have lost the ability to govern ourselves, hence the government siding with ‘remain’. They can sit easy and pass the buck to Brussels. In 1972 we were fitted with a straight-jacket. It was a loose fit, and the ‘cut’ was for a Common Market place. But since then it has had the strings tightened with every additional treaty that has come along. With the opportunity to cut the ties, we have now to begin to learn governance once again – and it will be hard. Having been strapped in for so long, we are going to need physiotherapy – political physiotherapy, and during this period we will be very susceptible to mistakes and could easily take a fall.

    Here’s the nub: Many bloggers have waved the flag of independence over the past year or more, and now the referendum has been ‘won’ (I use the term loosely), they think it’s all over, when in fact it’s just beginning. The average person such as myself seeks continued information feeds – partly to stave off a degree of fear of government doing the wrong thing, which is perfectly possible, but also to counter and educate those who do fear for their future. None of us holds a crystal ball, but the bloggers – with a few brave exceptions – have brought us hope to the point of success, then up sticks and back into the woodwork. We are left in a partial vacuum. The six or seven blogs that have been my nourishment for the past few years are now slashed in half, just at the time when we are in intensive care and need information more than anytime before.

    So many thanks for your blog. I don’t Tweet of do Faecesbook, so it’s all the more appreciated.

    Cheers

    Derek Reynolds

    Like

    • Samuel Hooper July 12, 2016 / 8:37 PM

      Thank you Derek for your very kind words, it’s an honour to have you as a reader. Obviously I quite agree with your assessment that now is when we need to be most vigilant that the political class actually execute the instructions that we have given them to take us out of the EU. It’s certainly no time for independent bloggers to hang up their keyboards, and I will certainly keep on writing and doing the best I can to provide independent analysis.

      Thanks again and all the best – Sam.

      Like

  4. Chris in Santa Cruz August 14, 2015 / 11:48 PM

    I’m an ex-Brit who has lived in the US since 1989, but I continue to follow – and be fascinated by – UK politics. Especially now. Your blog is the first one I’ve found that generally agrees with my views, with some infuriating and enjoyable exceptions. And you write very well; it’s always a pleasure to read your views and analysis, even (especially) when I don’t agree with them, which is rare. Keep up the good work! Certainly until after the 12th September …

    Liked by 1 person

    • Samuel Hooper August 15, 2015 / 5:35 PM

      Thanks so much for reading, and for the very kind feedback, it really is great to hear that you enjoy the site whether or not you agree with the opinions expressed. I’ll certainly keep it up through the Labour leadership election and well beyond.

      I’ve often thought that British expats (I’m currently back in London but will eventually settle in the States) have an interesting and unique take on politics. Of course we retain a love and affection for the motherland, but something about tasting American individuality and constitutional governance then colours our perceptions of everything that is happening back home. Or maybe that’s just me…

      Either way, sincere thanks for taking the time to give such nice feedback. Keep do keep reading and commenting, and do share with others any articles you particularly like.

      Like

  5. realspin April 18, 2015 / 3:07 PM

    A really impressive blog full of clever, critical and nuanced thinking that picks through the opaque ‘fog’ of political war. Welcome to England, y’all!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Samuel Hooper April 18, 2015 / 10:24 PM

      Many thanks for reading, and for your kind words. I hope you keep stopping by and continue to enjoy the political discussion here.

      Like

  6. londonbridgesharon March 24, 2014 / 10:12 PM

    Finally looked at your blog and really like the subjects dissected here – keep going honey – I will follow you too – love Sharon (I am missing the group already!)

    Like

    • Semi-Partisan Sam March 25, 2014 / 10:26 PM

      Many thanks for reading and for the kind words, Sharon. I’m very happy to have you as a follower and I continue to enjoy following your blog!

      I also find myself missing the group – I think we managed to learn a lot during those six weeks with The Big Issue and Poached Creative!

      Like

  7. Matt Stewart January 27, 2014 / 3:26 AM

    Interesting blog. With the exception of, well, Margaret Thatcher, I am shamefully ignorant of British politics. But, I think we come down pretty similar in political views. Looking forward to more posts!

    Like

    • Semi-Partisan Sam January 31, 2014 / 1:19 AM

      Many thanks for reading, and for your kind words. I think you would find it interesting to follow British politics a little, as we wrestle with many of the same questions (economic stimulus vs austerity, individual freedom vs collective action, civil liberties vs national security) that are ongoing in the United States. I find that following the debate on both sides of the Atlantic hopefully gives me a sense of perspective on some of the issues that I would otherwise lack.

      Like

      • Matt Stewart January 31, 2014 / 6:54 AM

        I am certainly looking forward to doing so. I agree that it gives you an excellent, and quite unique, perspective on politics.

        I think an issue I find particularly compelling is the difference between the gun laws. From what I can tell, the U.K. and the U.S. could hardly be more different if they tried.

        Like

  8. Hannah Ellen Clare January 9, 2014 / 12:32 AM

    Just came across your blog through browsing the reader – I’m from Harlow too (although born 11 years after you) I want to see more political blogs and while our politics are different, what I’ve read so far is interesting 🙂

    Like

  9. gpcox September 11, 2013 / 7:58 PM

    Very pleased to meet you. Politics, eh? Maybe you will be able to explain why politicians are like they are? Can they be born double-talking?

    Like

    • Semi-Partisan Sam September 11, 2013 / 9:47 PM

      Many thanks for the visit and the comment! I wish I could give you a coherent explanation about politicians… I do believe that most pols initially run for office out of a genuine desire to do good. The problem begins on day +1 when they have to start raising money for re-election, which immediately involves a whole host of compromises with lobbyists, donors and special interests. If the politician has higher aspirations and covets a leadership position then the problem is only exacerbated.

      I have always felt that so many of the problems – in the United States and the United Kingdom – could be solved by introducing term limits. Somewhere along the way we have lost the idea of the “citizen politician” who temporarily leaves his business or employment to serve his constituents, before relinquishing his power and returning to private life. George Washington set a great example, as have several British prime ministers. Both of our countries are struggling under the weight of problems that could have been easily avoided if our elected politicians had leveled with the people about the issues where there was still time to take relatively painless corrective action. But as it stands now, speaking the truth to the people involves losing a life-long job and source of income. It takes a brave person to make that sacrifice.

      Sadly, I believe that as long as being a politician is seen as a career for life, there is little hope for eradicating the “double-talk” that you speak of.

      Like

      • gpcox September 12, 2013 / 9:36 AM

        I actually forgot about the “citizen politician”, I suppose it has been a long time. Thank you for taking the time to answer.

        Like

      • Jeremy Edwards October 28, 2014 / 4:30 PM

        I feel you have hit the nail squarely on the head!
        Perhaps all politicians should be limited to two terms and made to have a proper job before and after.
        As an IFA, the privileged pension rights for all MPs burns my soul as it gives them no incentive to offer more than a sop to the (more) common man. The present multiple stupidities involved in pension and tax reform are a model of the consequences of ignorant meddling.

        Like

  10. Eye On The Nation July 10, 2013 / 7:18 PM

    We might not have the same beliefs, but i do like your blog. Thanks for visiting mine.

    Like

  11. Jenny March 8, 2012 / 10:22 PM

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s